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October 8, 2015

Some More Finished Reaper Bones

by PeterG
The patina begins

The patina begins

 

Some of the first figures I tackled when my box of rewards from Reaper Miniatures second Bones campaign on Kickstart arrived were what I called the Hero-on-Big-Base figures.  Very characterful figures mounted on large, sculpted bases. Fairly easy to see why they appealed to me right away.  The names I use are entirely of my own making so don’t try looking them up in the catalog.

Ghoul Lord

The first was a ghoul like character whose visage was miscast to the point of offending the camera.  No, really, it is a terrible casting with a concave face that I was able to build a bit of a nose onto with green stuff.  Came out alright but the rock is my favorite part, truth be told.  I don’t see him leading my Kings of War Undead anytime soon.

 

Ugly with a capitol Uggg

Ugly with a capitol Uggg

Better in Profile

Better in Profile

Even Better from behind

Even Better from behind

The Rook

Since this guy is covered in pieces of castle and appears to be standing on a tiny tower I thought of him as The Rook. There is just something fun, goofy really, about the exaggeration of these minis and wearing big bits of architecture seems perfectly acceptable. Sort of medieval meets anime’ really. Just look at the size of the blades. Despite all the masonry, Rook is a fairly simple figure so I kept the paint job simple and finished in just under an hour.

 

Rook1

Who uses that tiny door?

Rook2

Nice how the arch and portcullis fit over his upper arm.

Rook3

Blade is almost as wide as he is.

Rook5

He does look vigilant

RookCloseUp

He’s wondering who is going to help him out of this parade float of an outfit.

Demonblade

I’m no sure why all the male knights in this set are bald but it is what it is. Must have something to do with the helmets none of them are wearing. Demonblade ,or DB to his friends, has lots of fancy armor so I figured the shoulder plates should be differentiated and went with bronze. Weathering them was half the fun. Like Rook this fellow was kept simple and finished in just under an hour.

 

Demonblade5

Probably trying to figure out where to set the sword

Demonblade4

The runes and diagrams cut into the rock are a nice touch.

Demonblade3

The cape was fun.

Demonblade2

Another nice view of the wards he’s standing in.

Demonblade1

Such a fun anime’ pose.

DBClose

He said what about my sword?

Hammertime

If there was any doubt as to the influence of anime’ on these sculpts then this cleric’s hammer should banish them. I’m guessing it would weigh more than the holy warrior and his armor combined. Must be some divine inspiration or magic that makes up for the physics. It was the rough stairs of the base that first drew my attention to this miniature and where I started work. A dunk in a mug of hot water before a bath of cold to straighten the shaft of his weapon and he was ready for painting. I had such fun with his various layers and materials that I went well over my self imposed time limit. The shoulder pad was especially useful for some heraldry.

 

Hammer5

I had such fun painting the steps.

Hammer4

Okay, the fabric was fun too.

Hammer3

The metal bits turned out to be very engaging because a hammer that large has to look like it’s been around.

Hammer2

…and the heraldry. I like the heraldry.

Hammer1

Silly weapon or not, this was a blast to paint.

HammerShoulder

Can’t go wrong with fleur de lile.

Hammerclose

Rather pleased with how he came out. Bet he ends up in a Kings of War army or part of a RPG.

Chaosgrrrl! and Rojo.

One of the last ones I painted from this set as I really wanted to spend some time working on her charming shield. Another massive weapon but at least she has some armor covering the side of her not protected by the tower shield. With the anime’ influence it seems that female costumes can often be as small as the weapons are large so this was a step in the right direction. Her navel maybe exposed but those spiked plates on her armor aren’t just for show. I named her shield Rojo and saved the bound demon for last. I liked the idea of him having opinions, arguments, and conversations with the lithe chaos warrior so tried to paint them eyeing each other. Sort of a twist on the whole Elric/Stormbringer relationship.

ChaosGirl1

She does not look happy.

ChaosGirl5

She’s slender but strong.

CGClose2

I said we should have turned left…

CGClose1

I’m not having this discussion.

ChaosGirl4

The plinth would make a great base for minis used as chess pieces

ChaosGirl3

Might be her best side as well

ChaosGirl2

ChaosGrrl and Rojo

 

Firecrest

The heavily armored warrior woman looked rather Greek in her crested helm so I opted for a Spartan color scheme besides, I had intended to patina her armor when I saw her picture in the campaign and there was already a lot of red on my wet pallet from working on Rojo.  That I got to play with the natural aspects of stone and ivy was a bonus really.

 

FCWiP1

Basic paint job done

FCWiP2

Now to make it ancient

Firecrest1

Looking better but not finished

Firecrestclose

Crest is…okay

Firecrest4

But something is still missing

Firecrest3

Maybe another polish to the armor…

Firecrest2

Maybe some plants?

 

She was looking pretty good but just not complete and it wasn’t just the bad photos.  She needed something else but I decided against adding any outside materials.  I was also trying to keep each Bones mini under an hour but regularly stretch that on fun figures like this one so I compromised and put her aside over night.  After coffee and breakfast I picked her up and just began painting.  The wet pallet I’ve started using was very helpful with this I can tell you.  It is super useful for unit painting but that’s a whole different post.  I might still add a red gem to the hilt of her sword but all in all I think she really came out well.

 

FinFireCrest1

Now that’s looking finished!

FinFireCrestClose3

The two tone crest looks much more dramatic

FinFireCrestclose2

Even the statue needed more work.

FinFireCrest4

No spit but definitely polish.

FinFireCrest3

Some more highlighting, a couple of horizontal stripes, and it’s working.

FinFireCrest2

Now to find her a heavy pike block to command. Heck, give her an army.

 

Having painted a fair number of Reaper Bones to date I have formed a few opinions.  While the material has short comings it definitely has some big benefits.  First problem issue I’ve found is that fine detail (like women’s noses, fingers, the Ghoul Lord’s nose and eye) can be mashed up or missing.  The second is the mold release used sticks around and messes with paint adherence.  The latter issue is solved by my better cleaning the minis beforehand while the former is harder to solve.  Now the positives begin with the price of figures being downright cheap. So cheap I don’t mind taking chances on color schemes or painting techniques as well as picking up figures I might not otherwise (I’m looking at you Bugbear and Gnoll troops) so now have a big collection of dungeon dwellers ready to go When Dungeon Saga arrives.  Another plus is the wide variety of minis Reaper has already produced so one is spoiled for choice regardless of genre’.  Storing them before or after painting is aided by the fact that they are light weight and when you start collecting miniature war gaming armies that starts to matter.  My favorite aspect, so far, is that once finished the acrylic paint seems to bond with the bendy plastic and flexes rather than chips.  I do love how the terrain pieces paint up with the bases in the above post as examples.  Honestly, I’m more excited about working on the ruins included in Dragons Don’t Share than either the adventurers or the dragon.  All in all, I like the material though I think I may limit future Bones purchases to architecture and BIG monsters.  Those come out wonderfully and really benefit from the light weight.

 

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